A new tool to study Huntington’s disease

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have transformed skin cells from patients with Huntington’s disease into the type of brain cell affected by the disorder. The resulting mass of neurons serves as a new tool to study the degenerative...

Like Zika, West Nile virus causes fetal brain damage, death in mice

Two viruses closely related to Zika – West Nile and Powassan – can spread from an infected pregnant mouse to her fetuses, causing brain damage and fetal death, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest...

Stroke recovery improved by sensory deprivation, mouse study shows

Researchers helped mice recover faster from stroke by clipping their whiskers (as shown in video). This temporarily shuts off neural signaling between the whiskers – an important sensory organ for mice – and the brain, opening up a vacant space in the brain and making...

Kow Essuman and colleagues publish paper in Current Biology

The Milbrandt lab had a paper published recently in Current Biology. The paper, “TIR Domain Proteins Are an Ancient Family of NAD+-Consuming Enzymes,” shows that TIR domain proteins from both bacteria and archaea cleave NAD+ into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose (ADPR),...

Genetic lung disease’s molecular roots identified

Respiratory infections peak during the winter months, and most people recover within a few weeks. But for those with a rare genetic lung disease, the sniffling, coughing and congestion never end. The tiny hairlike structures called cilia that normally sweep mucus...

Light as a weapon against metastatic cancer

A new anti-cancer strategy wields light as a precision weapon. Unlike traditional light therapy — which is limited to the skin and areas accessible with an endoscope — this technique can target and attack cancer cells that have spread deep inside the body, according...

Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventable

More than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved...

Viruses exacerbate disease caused by Leishmania parasite

More than a million people in tropical countries contract the parasite Leishmania every year through the bites of infected sand flies. Most people develop disfiguring – but not life-threatening – skin lesions at the sites of the bites. But if the parasite spreads to...

Formula made with cow’s milk does not increase diabetes risk

A 15-year global study of children genetically predisposed to developing Type 1 diabetes found that drinking formula made with cow’s milk did not increase such children’s risk for developing the disease. The findings provide a long-awaited answer to the question of...

Lack of sleep boosts levels of Alzheimer’s proteins

Have you resolved to take better care of yourself in the new year? Here’s a relatively painless way to do it: Catch a few more zzz’s every night. A third of American adults don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic...

Study prompts new ideas on cancers’ origins

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/Mills%20met%20.mp3Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer — a finding that could upend the way scientists...

Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapy

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/VT%20radiation%20.mp3Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy — aimed directly at the heart — can be...

A key to tackling childhood obesity: Involve families and follow up

When trying to help children lose weight, involving a parent in the treatment makes the entire family healthier, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown. Investigators from the university’s Center for Healthy Weight and Wellness...

Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study shows

Diabetes is known to increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Further, the researchers deduced...

Brain networks that help babies learn to walk ID’d

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/NM%20Cer%20Cort.mp3Scientists have identified brain networks involved in a baby’s learning to walk — a discovery that eventually may help predict whether infants are at risk for autism. The findings build on previous...

Clot-busting drugs not recommended for most patients with blood clots

Not all patients with blood clots in their legs – a condition known as deep vein thrombosis – need to receive powerful but risky clot-busting drugs, according to results of a large-scale, multicenter clinical trial. The study showed that clearing the clot with drugs...

Medicare shift to quality over quantity presents challenges

A new study hints that even large physician practices may have trouble moving to a payment system that rewards quality of health care over quantity of services delivered. The analysis included data from the first year of a program run by the Centers for Medicare and...

Obesity prevented in mice fed high-fat diet

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/Long-Hedgehog%20.mp3Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a way to prevent fat cells from growing larger, a process that leads to weight gain and obesity. By activating a...

Pursuing a precision paradigm

Of the top-grossing domestic movies of 2017 to date, three of the Top 5 feature superheroes: ­Wonder ­Woman; Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2; and ­Spider-Man: Homecoming. Similarly, in 2016, five of the Top 10 ­movies focus on adventure and heroes, including ­Captain...

Building the foundation for discovery

Lilianna ­Solnica-Krezel (right), PhD, the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor and Chair of Developmental Biology, and Farshid Guilak (center), PhD, professor of orthopaedic surgery, co-direct the ­Center of ­Regenerative ­Medicine and Simple Model...

A promising future

At Washington University, training the next generation of leaders in translational medicine is a key focus. “The young people in our labs are smart and dedicated, and they know that what we’re doing will change medicine — 20 years, 10 years, 5 years from now,” Skip...

Cutting NIH budget could cripple drug development

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/NIH%20cuts%20.mp3A proposal to slash funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) could severely impair the development of new, life-saving drugs, according to a new analysis by researchers at Washington University...

Can laughing gas help deter suicide?

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/nitrous-suicide%20story.mp3Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are studying the use of nitrous oxide — laughing gas — as a treatment for patients who are hospitalized due to suicidal...

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy

The busy world inside a cell is directed by its DNA blueprint. When the blueprints are altered, cells can sicken, die or become cancerous. To keep DNA in working order, cells have ways to detect and mend damaged DNA. Now, researchers at Washington University School of...

$6 million supports leukemia research

John F. DiPersio, MD, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a $6 million outstanding investigator award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support research aimed at improving...

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition

A defective gene linked to autism influences how neurons connect and communicate with each other in the brain, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Rodents that lack the gene form too many connections between brain neurons...

Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons’ firing

The British have a pithy way of describing people who dither over spending 20 cents more for premium ice cream but happily drop an extra $5,000 for a fancier house: penny wise and pound foolish. Now, a new study suggests that being penny wise and pound foolish is not...

Key malaria parasite findings could lead to new treatments

Sebastian Nasamu, an MD/PhD student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, battled successive bouts of malaria as a child growing up in Ghana. He survived ­– but decided long ago to commit himself to eradicating the disease. The possibility that his...

Large declines seen in teen substance abuse, delinquency

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/RG%20Psyc%20Med%20.mp3More than a decade of data indicates teens have become far less likely to abuse alcohol, nicotine and illicit drugs, and they also are less likely to engage in delinquent behaviors, such as fighting...

New gene-altering treatment offered for certain blood cancers

Amanda Cashen, MD, examines patient Marie Miceli at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Miceli successfully responded to a new immunotherapy — called CAR-T cell therapy — that targets certain blood...

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis

An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Health-care workers rely on leg measurements to assess...

Postdoc researcher Cao receives STAT honor

CaoBin Cao, a Washington University postdoctoral researcher who studies how the placenta protects the fetus from infections such as Zika virus, has been named a 2017 Wunderkind by the national biomedical publication STAT News. The award honors young scientists and...

Alzheimer’s gene poses both risk — and benefits

Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. A major player is a gene called TREM2, mutations of which can substantially raise a person’s risk of the disease. The bad news is that in the early...

Moving toward a pay-for-value model of prescription drug pricing

One of the health care issues about which seemingly all Americans agree: Prescription drug prices have skyrocketed. And they keep going higher. How do Americans get better value for their health care dollars? One answer may be novel pricing models that more closely...

Genetic testing helps set safe dose of common blood thinner

Warfarin is a blood thinner that is commonly prescribed to patients to prevent life-threatening blood clots. Despite its longtime use, warfarin remains tricky to dose because a person’s genetic makeup influences how the drug is processed in the body. Too much warfarin...

Antibiotics warranted for kids with minor staph infections

The overuse of antibiotics has left some doctors questioning whether to give such drugs to children diagnosed with uncomplicated staph infections. Such infections often occur on the skin and look like a pus-filled bug bite. Now, research led by Washington University...

Antibody protects against both Zika and dengue, mouse study shows

Brazil and other areas hardest hit by the Zika virus – which can cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads – are also home to dengue virus, which is spread by the same mosquito species. A new study led by researchers at Washington University School of...

Kow Essuman wins FEBS Journal Poster Prize

Kow Essuman was awarded the FEBS Journal Poster Prize for an outstanding poster at the FASEB Conference on NAD+ Metabolism and Signaling. The conference was held July 9-14, 2017, in New Orleans. Congratulations, Kow!    Powered by WPeMatico

Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys

Outdoor air pollution has long been linked to major health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A new study now adds kidney disease to the list, according to researchers at Washington University School of...

Clues to ancient past: baby mummy, dinosaur skulls scanned

The mummified remains of a 7-month-old baby boy and pieces of skull from two teenage Triceratops underwent computed tomography (CT) scans Saturday, Sept. 16, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, in hopes researchers could learn more about the...

Scientists find way to convert bad body fat into good fat

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/PexRAP%20Cell%20rep.mp3There’s good fat and bad fat in our bodies. The good fat helps burn calories, while the bad fat hoards calories, contributing to weight gain and obesity. Now, new research at Washington University...

Pet, pest allergens linked to reduced asthma risk

A new study of children living in inner-city areas and at high risk of developing asthma suggests that exposure to certain pet and pest allergens in infancy lowers the risk of developing asthma by age 7. The research also provides evidence that the type of bacteria...

Medical students not trained to prescribe medical marijuana

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/Med%20marijuana-med%20edu.mp3Although 29 states and the District of Columbia allow marijuana use for medical purposes, few medical students are being trained how to prescribe the drug. Researchers at Washington University...

Does improving cardiovascular health reduce risk of dementia?

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/Binder%20rrAD%20.mp3Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are recruiting volunteers for a national study that is exploring whether strategies to improve cardiovascular health also reduce the...

Does health insurance status affect childhood cancer survival?

Privately insured children and those with Medicaid at the time of a cancer diagnosis experience largely similar survival trends, with slight evidence for an increased risk of cancer death in children who were uninsured at diagnosis, finds a new study from the Brown...

Potential new therapy relieves chronic itch

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/JAK%20itch%20.mp3The roots of chronic itching have long remained a mystery. Meanwhile, those with the condition suffer from an unrelenting and sometimes debilitating urge to scratch. Now, new research at Washington...

Siteman Cancer Center opens north St. Louis County location

Siteman Cancer Center will begin seeing patients July 1 at its newest satellite location, Christian Hospital in north St. Louis County. Siteman Cancer Center is based at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, and the new location is...

New clues found to common respiratory virus

By age 2, most children have been infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which usually causes only mild cold symptoms. But people with weakened immune systems, such as infants and the elderly, can face serious complications, including pneumonia and – in some...

Peter Wang passes qualifying exam

Peter Wang passed his qualifying exam on June 13, marking a major checkpoint in his graduate studies. Congratulations, Peter!Powered by WPeMatico

UTI treatment reduces E. coli, may offer alternative to antibiotics

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections, and they tend to come back again and again, even when treated. Most UTIs are caused by E. coli that live in the gut and spread to the urinary tract. A new study from Washington University School of...

McKinley Research Building

Labs on the move Opening of research facility signals new era in collaborative science Robert Boston The facility at 4515 McKinley Avenue becomes a hub for collaborative research. It also will be a popular lunchtime destination, with designated parking for food trucks...

Research Interests in the Department of Genetics

Geneticists seek to understand how genes are inherited, modified, and expressed. Geneticists have been remarkably successful in deciphering the genetic code and in providing a clear picture of the nature of the gene, but much remains to be learned about fundamental...

Cohen, Mitra named Goldfarb professors

Barak A. Cohen, PhD, and Robi D. Mitra, PhD, have been named Alvin Goldfarb Distinguished Professors of Computational Biology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Cohen The relatively new field of computational biology blends genetics and...