Cutting NIH budget could cripple drug development

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/NIH%20cuts%20.mp3 A proposal to slash funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) could severely impair the development of new, life-saving drugs, according to a new analysis by researchers at Washington University...

Can laughing gas help deter suicide?

https://biomedradio-media.wustl.edu/episodes/nitrous-suicide%20story.mp3 Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are studying the use of nitrous oxide — laughing gas — as a treatment for patients who are hospitalized due to suicidal...

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy

The busy world inside a cell is directed by its DNA blueprint. When the blueprints are altered, cells can sicken, die or become cancerous. To keep DNA in working order, cells have ways to detect and mend damaged DNA. Now, researchers at Washington University School of...

$6 million supports leukemia research

John F. DiPersio, MD, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a $6 million outstanding investigator award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support research aimed at improving...

Don Conrad and Joe Dougherty awarded tenure

Congratulations to Dr. Don Conrad and Dr. Joe Dougherty, who were recently awarded tenure in the Department of Genetics. Read more about Dr. Conrad’s work here, and get more information about Dr. Dougherty’s work here....

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition

A defective gene linked to autism influences how neurons connect and communicate with each other in the brain, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Rodents that lack the gene form too many connections between brain neurons...

Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons’ firing

The British have a pithy way of describing people who dither over spending 20 cents more for premium ice cream but happily drop an extra $5,000 for a fancier house: penny wise and pound foolish. Now, a new study suggests that being penny wise and pound foolish is not...